Understanding the Costs of Learning to Drive Part 2

If you’re reading this post, then chances are you’ve already read through part one of our “costs of learning to drive” series. In this post we will look to go through the remaining costs that surround learning to drive with a local driving instructor.

But first, let’s quickly cover everything from the previous post. In part 1 of the costs of learning to drive, we identified and discussed the following points:

  • Driving Lesson Prices
  • Provisional Driving License
  • Theory Test

What Other Costs of Learning to Drive Are There?

Unfortunately, for those of you that are taking lessons – the costs of getting your driving license doesn’t stop there.

The remaining four points are also needed in order to pass successfully:

  • Practical Driving Test Fee’s
  • Additional Theory Training
  • Learner Insurance
  • P+L Plates (Optional)

The DVSA recommends that learner drivers complete 45 hours of driving lessons in Milton Keynes as well as an additional 22 hours of private training. We will discuss this further later in the article when we get to learner insurance.

Practical Driving Test Fee’s:

Something you cannot be without if you plan on gaining your full UK license. Many pupils assume that the costs of their driving lessons include the fees needed to take a practical driving test – that’s not the case.

There is a fee involved with booking a practical test.

The current cost of a practical driving test here in the UK, whether you take driving lessons in Norwich or Milton Keynes, it will remain the same unless the DVSA states otherwise.

The cost for a practical driving test on an evening currently stands at £75. This is cheaper in morning periods and can be booked at £62.

Additional Theory Training:

I know we discussed theory training in the previous post on the costs of learning to drive; the topics mentioned then were solely based around the costs of the theory examination.

However, there are a few things that you should be investing in to help you pass faster and improve as a driver, ready for when you get behind the wheel.

Additional theory training isn’t a non-negotiable requirement; it is completely down to you, but certainly a worthwhile investment. The costs of additional theory training through books, CD-ROMS, DVD’s and Apps are next to nothing and really have helped hundreds of new drivers pass their theory tests quicker.

Learner Driver Private Insurance:

We mentioned above that the DVSA recommends that new drivers take a minimum of 45 hours with a driving instructor and an additional 22 hours of private training to get to a test standard.

Of course, this figure doesn’t represent everyone’s driving ability as some people learn quicker than others. The important thing to remember is to learn at your own pace.

If you plan on private driving, you will need something that has been labelled “learner insurance”. You need to be covered should any incidents occur during the time that you’re on the roads.

Unfortunately, you can’t simply go out on the open road with no one by your side. You must have an experienced driver by your side and have L-plates visible to make other road users aware.

P + L Plates for Training and Passing:

Showing P-plates when you pass your driving test isn’t absolutely necessary but it does allow you to gain a little leniency from other road users. If they don’t see an L or P-plate then they will assume that you’ve been driving for years and pay become inpatient in busy traffic situations.

Of course, if you’re newly passed, you’re not going to be ready for every driving scenario. You’ll learn more as you begin to drive on your own more frequently.

P-plates are used for new drivers, whereas L-plates are used to show other drivers that you’re currently under tuition.

If you have recently passed your driving test in locations such as London, showing P-plates after completing your driving lessons in London would be a good idea.

Packs of P and L-plates can be purchased for as little as £10.

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